CATS: AN INTERMEZZO

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SOPHIE, ON EXPENSIVE KNOLL CHAIR SHE SHOULDN'T BE ON

SOPHIE, ON EXPENSIVE KNOLL CHAIR SHE SHOULDN’T BE ON

[From “Stand Up for Your Cats,” by Julia Baird, New York Times, March 29, 2015]

Cat men and women, we have the numbers. There are now roughly 95.6 million cats in America [compared to 83.3 million dogs].

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Part of the appeal of cats is that they are independent and discerning. They have few needs. They come to you when they want; you can’t force them, or cajole them. They can be fiercely affectionate. They are gloriously indifferent. Cats don’t pretend to like you, and don’t care if you like them.

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[From Honorable Cat, by Paul Gallico (Crown Publishers), pages 8-9]

Everything a cat is and does physically is … beautiful, lovely, stimulating, soothing, attractive and an enchantment.

It begins … with the compactness of construction, composition, size, proportion and general overall form. The domesticated cat is the tidiest of all animals. There is an almost divine neatness and economy about the animal. Completely packaged in fur with not a bald spot showing, rarely two specimens wholly alike, it often comes decorated with designs that Picasso might envy and always functionally streamlined for every activity; just another case of the practical made glamorous.

SASHA AT HER MORNING POST IN THE KITCHEN

SASHA, AT HER MORNING POST IN THE KITCHEN

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12 thoughts on “CATS: AN INTERMEZZO

  1. kathybjones

    Love this. We have a grey cat, named Jack, who fits all the cat criteria: aloof unless he decided not to be, affectionate on his terms, independent, but can also be demanding in the food or I-want-to-go-out realms.

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    • Many smart people (like us, Kathy) have at least one cat. Not only are they less needy for affection than dogs, they know how to put us in our place when we get too high and mighty!

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    • Thank you, Christine. Actually, we have two two cats — Sophie (at the top in the red chair) and Sasha (on the kitchen counter). Sophie is sort of cute, but yes, Sasha is an especially beautiful example of her breed. In fact, the breeder was thinking of keeping her for breeding, but circumstances compelled her to sell Sasha to us. That was six years ago, and we feel lucky she’s been part of our family that long.

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      • I dunno, Christine. But let yourself off the hook. British Blues do look alike, except to their owners, who see the slight differences in their shapes, degree of grey, and thickness of fur, their differing eating and playing styles, their differing degrees of sociability, their relationship to each other [dominant/ (usually) submissive], their relationship to us. They have even divided up the house and our bed into separate territories, so we can even sort of tell which is which from a distance, based on where she is. But how could you possibly know all that? You were just hurrying on to make your nice comment and go read the other posts in your reader! 🙂

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    • Thank you, Barbara. I agree, agree about Sasha. It’s Sophie in the red chair, though. Hard to tell them apart, it’s true, except for the faces. They’re very different in conduct and personality, though. But that doesn’t come through in photographs.

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  2. Lovely to see your characterful cats. We loved our two brother cats very dearly, they grew up with the children and died about when they were leaving home. We have not replaced them. I tell myself that maybe, when we can’t travel any more we will.

    Liked by 1 person

    • You’re right about the difficulty of traveling when there are two dependent little creatures at home who can’t come with you. We bought Sasha the year after our most extensive traveling was over. Now it’s mostly a weekend or so away at a time, when the two cats have each other and a twice-daily paid visitor to feed and play with them (and clean the litter boxes). If you loved your two cats while your children were at home, I’m pretty sure there will be two more once the traveling ceases.

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